How Would You Move Mount Fuji?

Lately I’ve been obsessing over the idea of progress. Progress in my fitness, progress in my finances, and most importantly, progress in my walk with God. For some reason, I don’t know if it’s just hardwired in my DNA, whenever I set out to improve on something, I want to be the best at it.

If I got it in my head that I want to start forging knives in my backyard, then my thought process would be: how can I make the best backyard blades anyone has ever seen. I would start reading books on knife making. I would follow 10 blogs on the subject. I would stay up late building a forge, hammering out the steel and driving my neighbors crazy.

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And then a week later I would be so burnt out on the subject that I would probably stop all together. This is something I do more times then I care to admit.

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Sprinting towards a goal can be a useful skill occasionally, like in the event of a short deadline. It’s equally important to be able to play the long game. Especially in something like your fitness and health.

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Your own fitness is something you should be working on for the rest of your life. Forget all the 10 lbs in 10 minutes, new year new me, I gotta get abs by May crap. If you want to make improvements to your fitness, then just start now and keep the train rolling.

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I was listening to a podcast called “Brute Strength” and I heard Chris Spealler talk about a concept of small improvements every day. When he was working with Ben Bergeron, Ben introduced the idea of just getting 1% better everyday. That’s not a very far reaching goal. Just focus on getting 1% better everyday and in 100 days, you’ll have gotten 100% better.

“Little strokes fell great oaks”- Ben Franklin

Good or bad, depending on how you look at it, the human body is a slow adapter. That’s the reason you could live off of beer and cigarettes for years before your life would be in jeopardy. That’s also the reason that crash diets and gym binge sessions don’t bring lasting or quick results.

If you just focus on making small improvements each day, you’ll have more success than if you try to kill yourself in the gym for a week strait.

“When you improve a little each day, eventually big things occur. When you improve conditioning a little each day, eventually you have a big improvement in conditioning. Not tomorrow, not the next day, but eventually a big gain is made. Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens — and when it happens, it lasts.” —John Wooden

So the answer to my question, How do you move Mt. Fuji?

One small stone at a time.

Do a little something each day to improve your fitness and well being.

  • Lift a little more weight then you did last week
  • Try to move a little faster between movements during a workout
  • Squat a little deeper or make sure you hit depth on each squat
  • Go to bed 5 min earlier then you did last night, and don’t hit the snooze button
  • drink one less soda or in our case, monster drink
  • Add veggies to one more meal than you normally get
  • drink one extra glass of water
  • Kiss your significant other one more time before bed

 

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